The Inking Woman: print edition

The Inking Woman, cover

You may remember my mention of the Inking Woman exhibition back in April last year. Well, now the accompanying book is out!

The joint authors are Nicola Streeten and Cath Tate. Among many other achievements, Nicola co-founded the Laydeez do Comics initiative, and Cath was the publisher behind the feminist postcards that graced many a kitchen in the 1980s.

I was unable to attend the launch party as I was (ahem) taking part in a feminist comics residence in Helsinki (about which, more to follow in a future blog post). However, I was lucky enough to get my hands on a copy the night before my travels, and it was just the thing for the three-hour plane trip — always assuming you don’t mind reading sometimes rather explicit comics while squeezed next to a stranger at a height of 35,000 feet, which apparently I don’t.

Here’s the page with my work on it. Of course, that’s the one I turned to first, but take my word for it that there are 138 other pages all bursting with comics by fantastic female creators, accompanied by that all-important thing, context.

Myfanwy Tristram in the Inking Woman

My lasting impression was that, as well as being a lot of fun to read, this book has done something very important in recording the history that led up to the current explosion in women making comics. It has cemented and legitimised the work of both professional and grassroots female comic makers, and people like me, who draw comics as a sideline*.

Now this history is in book form, it is ‘official’. It can be put in libraries and cited in academic papers. It provides an easy way for researchers, journalists, and anyone who’s interested to understand what a diversity of women there have been, and still are today, in this ridiculous and often time-consuming endeavour. And, because it’s a lovely hefty hardback volume, it may be just the thing for knocking some sense into all those who shrug and say, ‘Well, there simply are no women making comics’.

It turned out that this was the absolutely ideal book to have read on the way to a feminist comics residence. I’d had the 250 years of history: now here was the future. But as I say, lots more about that later.


*I had to stop and think for quite a while here, over what would be the best word. ‘Hobby’ seems too lame and ‘passion’ seems a bit, well, un-British. I feel as if there may be a French word for something which you are driven to do, out of love for the form. Do comment if you can think of it!


Top image: Myriad Editions

Broken Frontier Awards 2017

I’m delighted and surprised to discover that Draw the Line has been shortlisted for ‘best web comic’ in the Broken Frontier Awards for 2017, which seek to celebrate indie and alternative comic-making.

Read all about it and see the nominees in various categories here — and then click the blue button to cast your vote. There’s no minimum to how many categories you can vote in, and it’s anonymous: you don’t have to register, so it couldn’t be easier.

Building a ship with 50 Shades of Grey: when life imitates art

50 shades ship by Myfanwy Tristram

Here’s a funny thing. In 2013, my entry for the Comica/Cape/Observer Graphic Short Story competition pivoted around a charity shop worker who built a ship out of surplus donations.

Those surplus donations were mainly copies of the book Fifty Shades of Grey.

The whole thing came from my imagination. And yet… fast forward a couple of years to this morning, when I scroll through Twitter over breakfast, only to see:

Mashable: 50 Shades of Grey fort

Is it just me, or is that a bit of a coincidence?

You can read the news story here. And my original strip is at the foot of this post, if you’d like to see how on earth I included this unlikely extremely probable concept.

Salon of Rejects – London launch event

Salon of Rejects comic

Hooray – I’ll be one of the ‘Salon of Rejects’ cartoonists speaking at Gosh Comics in London on April 6.

Come along! Drink booze! Look at drawings! Hear me deliver a flawless presentation on the state of modern-day cartooning and my position therein*.

If you are a Facebook user, you can signal your intention to attend on this page.

If, on the other hand, you despise Mark Zuckerberg and all he stands for, just let me know that you intend to come, and I’ll sneak you onto the invite list from the back end.

Oh yes, and don’t forget that you can buy your copy of this beautiful comic here.

 

*Disclaimer: presentation may not be flawless.